30 Best Hiking Trails In Upstate NY (Pet-Friendly With Amazing Views)

If you want to get away from the hustle and bustle of the big city, upstate New York has some of the best hiking trails for all skill levels. As you’re looking for trails, you’ll drive down scenic country roads, past rolling mountains, and waterfalls.

From easy loop trails around New York lakes to mountain hikes in New York State Parks, you’ll have a variety of challenges to choose from. All of these trails range differently in difficulty, distance, and total elevation gain levels.

T&T Tips: There are some important things to be aware of before you begin your hike.

  • Bring a bag along the way just in case you see any trash you can grab.
  • Make sure you stay on the trails. Verging off the trails can be dangerous and also damage the terrain.
  • Do not park illegally. Check ahead to see if there are parking areas and if there are any parking fees to pay.
  • Make sure to pack plenty of water, food, hiking boots, flashlight, rope, hiking pole, sun protection, a map, and bug spray.

Beautiful Hiking Trails To Explore In Upstate NY

1. Anthony’s Nose

Credit: Mihai_Andritoiu

Anthony’s Nose Trail is a hard hike that will take you almost five hours to complete. It is pet-friendly as long as dogs are on a leash. The first mile of this trail is very steep. The trail is well-marked, has great altitude, and has amazing views.

It has just enough inclines to keep your heart pumping, and challenging rock climbing in the last two miles. After one of the intense inclines, you’ll be rewarded with views of the Hudson River. You’ll see vultures and red-tailed hawks, along with tug boats in the water.

If you want to avoid crowds, we recommend going on a Monday. If you go on a weekend the narrow trails along with the steepness could make people nervous. If this trail reminds you of a staircase, that’s exactly what it is, a well-maintained one at that.

Anthony’s Nose Peak is directly above Bear Mountain Bridge. It’s one of the most well-known trails in the Hudson Valley. Based on reviews, visitors love the breathtaking views once you reach the top of the trail. The hike can be strenuous due to its rating, so make sure you bring plenty of food and water.

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 7.6 Mile
Total Elevation Gain: 2,421 Feet

2. Ausable Chasm

Credit: Meagan Marchant

Ausable Chasm has an assortment of adventure that is suitable for families. You can hike or climb as you explore through the forest, Rainbow Falls, Elephant’s Head, Column Rock, and Hyde’s Cave.

The Ausable Chasm Trail is an easy hike that will take you around one hour to complete. This trail is open all year long but is not pet-friendly, so you’ll need to leave your dogs at home for this hike.

There is an inner sanctum trail that is yellow for getting up close. It is narrow so you’ll want to avoid hiking this trail on a busy day. The big dry chasm (orange trail), is after the bridge and surrounded by cliffs. There is a twenty-dollar fee to walk this trail.

Based on reviews, most visitors opt for the two-part classic tour that takes you hiking through the upper chasm, followed by the scenic float. Many dislike the twenty-dollar fee, but given the amount of exploring available, it’s well worth the price.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 1.9 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 328 Feet

3. Breakneck Ridge Trail

Credit: Mihai_Andritoiu

Breakneck Ridge Trail is a hard hike that will take you a little over three hours to complete. The trail is pet-friendly, as long as they are on a leash. Most hikers like to come to complete this loop and are just looking for an escape from the big city noise.

You’ll experience steep climbs and rocky ledges. We recommend following the Loop counterclockwise because there are a lot of steep scrambles, so you’ll want to use precautions.

It is also recommended that you wear a good pair of shoes or boots that have good traction. Long pants, long sleeves, and gloves will make your hike much easier.

Based on reviews, this hike has amazing views once you complete the strenuous hike. Make sure you bring plenty of food and water so you don’t become dehydrated.

This trail is extremely difficult and is not recommended for small children or pets. If you have a chance to visit this trail, don’t pass it up!

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 3.2 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,250 Feet

4. Buttermilk Falls Gorge Trail

Credit: Nyker

The Buttermilk Falls Gorge Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around an hour to complete. This trail is pet-friendly as long as they are on a leash. It gets a little steep going uphill, but you’ll have stairs you can use for the hike back.

The trail connects to the bear trail which is rolling hills through the forest along the river bed and then connects to Treman Lake. It’s a bit narrow so you’ll want to avoid hiking this trail on a crowded day.

Buttermilk Falls is a popular waterfall that features two drops. The top of the falls is narrow and gets wider as you take your descent. The size of Buttermilk Falls is what makes this a gorgeous spot for hiking.

At the base of the falls, you’ll be able to cool off during the summer months to go for a swim. Based on reviews, visitors love the breathtaking views of this trail but do not recommend it for small children.

Difficult: Moderate
Distance: 1.6 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 462 Feet

5. Cascade and Porter Mountains

Credit: Felix Lipov

The Cascade and Porter Mountains is a hard hike that will take you a little over two hours to complete. This trail is pet-friendly as long as they are on a leash. The trails are easy to follow and if you’re doing both peaks, hike Porter first.

Cascade has a much more rewarding view and a better pinnacle of a hike. If the trails are muddy along the way, there are rock footholds you can use. Even with trails becoming crowded on weekends, the trails are wide enough so it’s not uncomfortable.

Cascade Mountain has 360 views and can be very windy at the top so use precaution. Porter is a calmer place to allow you to refuel and enjoy the views. Based on reviews, visitors say this is tough, but a doable trial. Be prepared for stepping on a lot of rocks.

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 5.6 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 2,286 Feet

6. Devil’s Hole Trail

Credit: Mervas

Devil’s Hole Trail is an easy hike that will take you a little over an hour to complete. The trail is pet-friendly as long as dogs are on a leash.

This trail has stairs, rocks, and boulders, and is a skinny path type so this may slow down your hike. There are about five hundred steps up and down so come prepared for a lot of climbing!

Based on reviews, visitors like the challenge of this trail, but some parts still seem to be closed off due to repairs.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 2.4 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 410 Feet

7. Labyrinth Trail

Credit: Mike Ver Sprill

The Labyrinth Trail is a hard hike that will take you around forty-five minutes to complete. This trail is not pet-friendly so you’ll need to leave your dogs at home for this hike. The trail itself is short, but the whole experience is had by the challenge.

Wear a comfortable pair of hiking shoes or boots that are light and grippy for the hike. The name of this trail is given due to the fact you have to figure out where your next move is going to be. There are markers for the obstacles that you will face.

You’ll find yourself climbing through tight pits and ditches. The trail is well-marked, well-maintained, and not recommended for hiking on a wet day. Based on reviews, visitors love the challenge this hike gives and its scenic views.

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 1 Mile
Total Elevation Gain: 291 Feet

8. Mount Marcy

Credit: Chelsea Mealo

Mount Marcy is the highest peak and will give you one of the most amazing views from the top. The shortest route to the summit is from the Adirondack Loj parking area. Only attempt this hike if you are an experienced hiker.

Mount Marcy is a hard hike that will take you around nine hours to complete. It is pet-friendly, as long as your dogs are on a leash. This trail can become wet and slick in certain areas so make sure to wear a good pair of hiking shoes with traction.

The last mile is very challenging so be prepared for the length and intensity. The trail is well-maintained with a gradual incline. Make sure you get to this location early as it can become very crowded.

Based on reviews, visitors say Mount Marcy has great views but can be muddy in certain areas.

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 16.7 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 3,536 Feet

9. Rim Trail and Gorge Trail Loop

Credit: Jam Norasett

The Rim Trail and Gorge Trail Loop is a moderately challenging hike that will take you a little over two hours to complete. This trail is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

This trail will give you beautiful high views of the falls in some areas. There have been areas of new construction that included bridges, stonework, and stairs. There is a lot of up and down elevation gain and loss with the terrain and all of the stairs.

Based on reviews, visitors say this is the best waterfall they’ve ever visited. They highly recommend going off the trail and hanging out at the base of Lucifer Falls.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 4.3 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 826 Feet

10. Grimes Glen Trail

Credit: Debora Truax

The Glens are known for their waterfalls and have the oldest fossilized tree located in New York State. You should be very prepared to get your feet wet here. There are a few small cascades after you cross the bridge.

Grimes Glen Trail is an easy hike that will take you around twenty-five minutes to complete. This is a pet-friendly trail as long as your dogs are on a leash. This is a nice quick trail even though it’s not well-maintained or simple.

The rocks can become slippery so make sure you’re extra careful around the water. If you can find them, there are extra footpaths between the first and second waterfalls. This hike does require some climbing so be prepared for climbing over branches and rocks.

Based on reviews, this trail has great views but can become very crowded. It is highly recommended that you wear rubber shoes for the water.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 1.1 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 98 Feet

11. Poet’s Ledge Trail

Credit: JW Cohen

Poet‘s Ledge Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you a little over four hours to complete. This trail is pet-friendly and dogs may be off-leash in some areas. The trail itself is a little overgrown, but easy to follow if you pay attention to the markers.

There are rock scrambles and very steep areas with flat terrain. Locals say even though it’s moderately rated, it’s one of the hardest hikes around. The trail can be a bit tricky to find so we’ve provided some directions to make it easier.

Coming out of the parking lot take a right and walk down the road until you reach the paved bridge over a creek. Take a sharp left until you reach the trail area. Walk down the road until you pass a barn house restaurant and take a right that goes uphill. The trail will be located on your right.

Based on reviews, visitors say they love the intensity of this hard, but it should be rated more difficult.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 6.4 Mile
Total Elevation Gain: 2,201 Feet

12. Black Mountain and Lake George Trail

Credit: Mike Ver Sprill

Black Mountain and Lake George Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you a little over three hours to complete. This trail is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash. The views on the top of the mountain are anything short of spectacular.

There is only a short portion of coming down the mountain that has a steep area. If you choose to hike the entire loop, there are a few peaceful ponds, but they can get muddy.

If you choose to hike down the back of the mountain, there’s a lookout called The Narrows. Be very cautious as this trail can become very muddy, watery, and slippery in many places.

Because of wet conditions, we recommend wearing a pair of hiking boots or shoes that have great traction. Based on reviews, visitors say this trail is well-maintained with amazing views.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 7.7 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,361 Feet

13. Clear Pond Trail

Credit: Felix Lipov

The Clear Pond Trail is an easy hike that will take you about an hour to complete. This trail is open all year long and is pet-friendly, with dogs being allowed off-leash in certain areas. With this hike, you can do the loop clockwise to Clear Pond and then to John Pond.

It is well-marked, well maintained, and well-drained. The Clear Pond trail stays flat for a bit in the beginning before it begins to slightly climb on the shoulder of the small ridge. The old trail comes in on the right that leads over to John’s Pond. From here it remains flat before it begins its descent.

Based on reviews, visitors say this is a quiet trail, but can become muddy in areas so make sure to wear a pair of water-resistant hiking boots.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 2.2 Mile
Total Elevation Gain: 275 Feet

14. Whiteface Mountain

Credit: Gestalt Imagery

The Whiteface Mountain Trail is a difficult hike that will take you around seven hours to complete. This trail is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash. It has beautiful conditions and can become muddy especially when you start to get higher up.

This trail is very manageable in sneakers if they have good traction. It does have many bugs so make sure to load up on bug spray before making the trip. The hike is strenuous, but once you make it to the top you are rewarded with 360 views of the valley.

Based on reviews, visitors say they love the intensity of this hike. Be careful on your way back. There are loose stones hidden under branches and leaves. It can become very easy to lose your footing if you aren’t paying attention.

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 10.1 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 3,618 Feet

15. Sleeping Beauty Mountain

Credit: Mervas

Sleeping Beauty Mountain is a moderately challenging hike that will take you a little over three hours to complete. This is a pet-friendly trail as long as your dogs are on a leash. This is a great trail that has a lot of variation between switchbacks and steep sections.

The trailhead has two parking lots so if you park at the first one you’ll add around three more miles to your trip. The views around Bumps Pond and Sleeping Beauty are gorgeous.

If you are hiking this trail during the winter, you’ll want to do this hike with spikes. Without spikes, wet conditions can make this trail almost impossible to complete.

Based on reviews, this trail is very well marked but could use some maintenance in certain areas.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 7 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,341 Feet

16. Cornish Estate Trail

Credit: Allen G.

The Cornish Estate Trail is an easy hike that will take you around forty-five minutes to complete. This trail is pet-friendly, as long as they are on a leash. It is an easy out and back trail with beautiful ruins to explore but can become a bit muddy so make sure you wear your hiking boots.

It has easy inclines and declines once you reach the paved trail at the estate. In the wintertime, you may experience slicker areas near buildings so make sure to watch your footing. The driveway can get a little steep in areas and there are certain parts where you’ll have to follow the stone paths. Once there you’ll be able to read about the estate’s history.

As you arrive at the estate grounds, there’s a bit of climbing to get to all of the placards, especially where Eagles Scouts’ gazebo is. This trail is very well-marked with lots of optional offshoots and great views of Storm King Mountain and Breakneck Ridge.

Based on reviews, visitors say this hike is short and easy, and they love the paved trails which make it animal and kid-friendly.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 1.8 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 190 Feet

17. The Appalachian Trail and Long Path Loop

Credit: Daniel Novak

The Appalachian Trail and Long Path Loop is a moderately challenging hike that will take you a little over two hours to complete. The best time to visit is from April to October, and the trail is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

This is a great trail with various terrain and not too many climbs or descends. The trail can become muddy and rocky in some areas but overall is easy to follow and well-marked.

If you’re hiking in the winter, it can become icy so make sure you bring your spikes. It is a challenging hike and there are several trail changes. Some of these are on unmarked trails.

Overall this is a nice hike and becomes less populated once you’re off the starting area Based on reviews, visitors love the views of this trail, but dislike its muddy conditions.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 5 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,010 Feet

18. Cobble Lookout Trail

Credit: Andrea DiSavino

The Cobble Lookout Trail is an easy hike that will take you over an hour to complete. This trail is pet-friendly as long as they are on a leash. The trail is well-marked but can become a bit muddy in some areas.

It has a gorgeous view, especially for such a short hike. The hike starts at the back of the parking area, which on weekends can become extremely busy and have an overflow of cars along the road.

The trail is wide, well-worn, and pretty easy to follow. The trail starts with a flat gravel stretch that reaches the bottom of the cliff.

Based on reviews, visitors love the views of this trail and its easy rating but dislike its muddy conditions.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 2.4 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 242 Trails

19. Kaaterskill Falls from Laurel House Road

Credit: Mihai_Andritoiu

Kaaterskill Falls from Laurel House Road is an easy hike that will take you around an hour to complete. This is a great hike with stairs that becomes very steep. On the spectrum of easy hikes, this one is a bit harder because the stairs are uneven at times.

This trail starts at the top with the platform overlooking the falls. The trails then goes down to the falls. You’ll want to bring your swimsuit for the waterfall. It is well-marked and you’ll have access to the overlook for those families who have strollers or wheelchairs.

Based on reviews, this trail has great views, but with there being one hundred and eighty-one stairs, it is stroller and wheelchair-friendly. This trail will get your heart pumping and has free parking.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 1.6 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 396 Feet

20. Chimney Mountain

Credit: JW Cohen

The Chimney Mountain trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you almost two hours. The best time to visit this trail is from March to October and is pet-friendly with dogs being allowed off-leash in certain areas.

It has amazing views for a short hike and steep inclines that make the view even more worth it. The park is well-worn so finding your way up will be easy.

There are also rocks to climb on so bring ropes if you want to climb the chimney or the true summit. The summit is interesting due to its natural stone structures that create a small peaks and fissures.

The parking area and trailhead are located on private property so to keep it open to the public you can contribute a few dollars to their box. Based on reviews, visitors love views at the top of this summit and say it’s worth enduring all of the inclines to get there.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 2.5 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 980 Feet

21. Balanced Rocks Trail

Credit: Nancy Kennedy

Balanced Rocks Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you almost two hours to complete. This trail is pet-friendly as long as dogs are on a leash. It has awesome 360 scenic views that are not kid-friendly especially if you have a backpack.

There are a lot of rock scrambles towards the top and it can be a bit muddy so watch out for slick rocks. In the beginning, it has some elevation gain then flat terrain after that.

Along your way to Balanced Rock on the right side of the trail, you’ll see several spurs that will lead you to lookouts. In areas, the trail will wind through fir and spruce trees.

Below Balanced rock, the trail dips through birch trees and heads north. To start the Balanced Rock trail turn right and follow the herd path. After about five hundred feet you’ll find the path.

Based on reviews, visitors love that this trail has a great view and scramble challenges.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 3.2 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 931 Feet

22. Wittenberg Mountain

Credit: Nyker

The Wittenberg Mountain trail is a hard hike that will take you almost six hours to complete. The best time to visit this trail is from April to October and is pet-friendly as long as dogs are on a leash. The trail will take up most of your day so make sure you set enough time aside.

This trail will give you quite the workout with large boulders and some technical areas and some large elevations over short distances. The hike can be strenuous up and back so make sure you bring plenty of food and water.

This is a beautiful hike and deserves all of its praise. If you visit during the weekend, you can expect a crowd so you’ll want to get here early. If you want to add-on to this hike, you can continue past the summit to Cornell Mountain.

If you are bringing a larger dog, please know that you may have to lift them in certain areas of steep spots. They’ll love this area more than you will!

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 8.5 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 3,103 Feet

23. Bear Mountain Loop Trail

Credit: yggdrasill

The Bear Mountain Loop trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you a little over two hours to complete. The best time to visit this trail is from April to November and is pet-friendly as long as dogs are on a leash.

This is a nice clean trail with crisp uphill climbs. It starts off steep with rock scrambles that lead to one viewpoint then continues to the top with a great view from the Perkins memorial tower. Make sure you pay extra attention to the trail as it’s not well-marked at some points.

Based on reviews, visitors give this trail an excellent rating and love the views and intense climbs.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 3.8 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,154 Feet

24. Bull Hill Full Loop

Credit: James Casil

The Bill Hill Full Loop trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around three hours to complete. The best time to visit this trail is from April to October and is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

This is a super interesting trail with spot markers. The area is mostly paved and cleared for the hike. The first part of the rail is mostly on a steep incline, but it makes for a great workout. The rest is an easy decline back to the parking lot area.

The climb to the top is a bit challenging, but the rest of the hike is very manageable. Based on reviews, visitors love the intensity of this trail and the ruins to explore.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 5.4 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,391 Feet

25. Popolopen Torne Loop

Credit: Kyle Tunis

The Popolopen Torne Loop trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you almost three hours to complete. This trail is pet-friendly as long as they are on a leash.

If you complete the hike clockwise you’ll get some nice scrambling and ascension. It’s a great trail that’s not too hard and still has a great view. This is a gorgeous hike that goes along the Popolopen Creek.

The climb up to the top is a nice challenge. Although most of this trail is tame, there are parts that may require you to use your hands. You’ll need to carefully navigate the turns so you don’t cut corners on this hike.

If you’re bringing your dog, they shouldn’t have any problems with this hike. The hike may not be easy for all dogs, but for most healthy dogs, it will.

Based on reviews, visitors seem to have different opinions on taking this hike either clockwise or counterclockwise. It is well-marked and very well-maintained so you shouldn’t have any problem with navigation. Once you get to the peak, you’ll be rewarded with an amazing view of the Hudson.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 5.2 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,253 Feet

26. Reeves Brook Loop Trail

Credit: James Parascandola

The Reece’s Brook Loop Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you about two hours to complete. The best time to hike here is from April to November. It is pet-friendly and dogs may be off their leash in certain areas.

The first half of this trail is all about climbing and elevation gain, but the views are worth the effort. You’ll see acres of rhododendrons, fern forests, waterfalls, and rocks for climbing.

The trails are well-marked once you are on them, but the turnoffs are not. It is easy to get lost so make sure you come prepared with directions just in case.

Based on reviews, visitors say the peak is gorgeous. Going down the red trail is wide open and very easy, including the large brook.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 3.8 Mile
Total Elevation Gain: 872 Feet

27. Buck Mountain Trail

Credit: I-M-A-G-E

The Buck Mountain Trail is a hard hike that will take you about four hours to complete. The best time to hike this trail is from March to November. This trail is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

There are more than eight mud pits you’ll need to cross so make sure you have a good pair of hiking boots. There are at least four or five active streams to cross and the bugs are a little intense so make sure you also bring bug spray. The trail is rocky and very steep in more than one area.

Based on reviews, visitors say you should bring a walking stick for rocky conditions. If you’re a new hiker, expect this to be a day trip, and bring a lot of food and water. The hike is intense and the views are stunning!

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 7 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,988 Feet

28. Mount Jo Loop Trail

Credit: Nyker

The Mount Jo Loop Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around one hour to complete. The best time to hike this trail is from April to October. It is also pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

During your hike, you will climb some steep boulders and stretches that are over trees. The long trail isn’t well-marked and there aren’t a lot of side paths, especially around large rocks. The view is gorgeous and level which makes this a great spot to relax.

Based on reviews, visitors say they don’t recommend this trail for beginners because of its intensity. For such a short hike they say it has a very steep incline.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 1.8 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 692 Feet

29. Hadley Mountain Trail

Credit: Stef Ko

The Hadley Mountain Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you about two and half hours to complete. The best time to hike is from March to November. It is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are leashed.

There is a lot of elevation change on the way up this mountain trail. The summit is open and offers a lot of great views. Once you reach the point in the trail where it levels off before the final push to the summit, it will make it all worth it.

If you’re looking to avoid crowds, we recommend going on a weekday. Because this is a popular trail, it is well-worn and heavily eroded in places.

The mountain and the entire trail are on the Forest Preserve. The trail varies between steep and gentle sections, but it provides a huge payoff with a panoramic view from the fire tower on the summit.

Based on reviews, visitors say this trail is easy to follow and the views make the challenging hike well worth it.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 3.4
Total Elevation Gain: 1,561 Feet

30. Diamond Mountain Trail

Credit: Nyker

The Diamond Mountain Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around two and a half hours to complete. This trail is pet-friendly as long as they are on a leash. If you plan to bring dogs, there are a few difficult areas but otherwise, it’s a great challenge if you have an athletic animal.

The trail begins from the Lake Sebago parking lot. From the parking lot, you will cross Seven Lakes Drive to access the trail. It’s a versatile trail with a lot of water scrambles.

T&T Tip: On the weekends this trail can become VERY crowded so we recommend going during the weekday for a more enjoyable hike.

The beginning is a steep climb to the top of Conklin Mountain until you get to Diamond Creek. From there you will cross the creek and continue up until you get to Seven Hills and make a sharp right turn. The road will continue straight. Many visitors miss this turnoff because it’s not well-marked.

Based on reviews, visitors love the view on this trail and say to go counterclockwise if you want to avoid the steep scrambles.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 5.3 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 859 Feet