30 Best Hiking Trails in Orange County, CA (Pet-Friendly Trails)

Orange County has some of the best hiking trails that you’ll find in California. Here you’ll find state parks and beaches with incorporated trails throughout. The various types of trails in suburban areas have flat terrain, while trails in the mountains have more rocky terrain.

You’ll find hidden waterfalls and beautiful coastal hikes with ocean views. If you need a hike of different skill levels to reconnect with nature, you’ll surely have your choice of the bunch.

Orange County can sometimes become overlooked in the busyness of California. With mountains in the northeast, it’s easy to lose the beauty among the thirty-four cities. Whether you’re a casual hiker or experienced outdoors, there’s a little something for everyone.

T&T Tips: Before traveling to any hiking destination, check for operating times and if there are any parking fees. Make sure you pack essential hiking gear such as sturdy hiking boots, plenty of water, food, a hat, sun protection, bug spray, and a trail map just in case you lose cellphone service.

Explore These 30 Hiking Trails in Orange County, CA

1. Back Bay Loop Trail

Credit: L.A. Nature Graphics

The Back Bay Loop Trail is an easy hike that will take you almost four hours to complete. The trail is open all year long and is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash. This is an easy, long hike around the bay and through the residential areas.

There are a lot of bikers so make sure to use extra precautions during your hike. If you want to hike or walk this entire loop, it will be heavily trafficked unless you get there early. The whole loop is broken into sections and not connected the whole way around.

The northern part of this trail is gorgeous and the southern part is RV resorts. This trail does have a couple of steep inclines but they are very manageable. If you venture into the residential neighborhoods, make sure you have a map because it’s easy to get lost and venture off of the trail.

There are a lot of hills, but little shade so make sure you bring sun protection. Based on reviews, visitors love the view on this hike but say they would leave children at home due to the hills.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 11.4 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 485 Feet

2. Buck Gully Trail

Credit: L.A. Nature Graphics

Buck Gully is a coastal Canyon in Newport Beach. The Canyon is held together by residential areas and the Pelican Hill Golf Course. The watershed that drains into Buck Gully goes across twelve hundred miles and includes areas of San Joaquin foothills.

The Buck Gully Trail is an easy hike that will take you almost two hours to complete. It is open all year long, but it’s not pet-friendly so dogs are not allowed on this trail.

This trail is narrow with high vegetation for most of the route. One of the great rules to this hike is that they only let bikers go up the trail and not down. This makes way for less congestion and makes hikers safer.

The trail is flat, well-marked, and is recommended for those who love nature but don’t want to travel too far.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 4.5 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 446 Feet

3. Sitton Peak Trail

Credit: Zaranda

The Sitton Peak Trail is a hard hike that will take you around five hours to complete. This trail is open all year long but is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

This trail has a steady incline on its narrow path then about two miles in you will get a mile of flat trail. On the way down there is little shade in some areas so we recommend hiking this trail early. The peak is pretty small and rocky and there are a lot of bugs so make sure you bring plenty of bug spray.

The Sitton Peak trailhead is the same as the Bear Canyon trailhead. There is a decent-sized parking lot, but it can fill up during peak hours. You may also park along the street, but make sure to stay on the shoulder to avoid incoming traffic.

As for fees, you’ll need to purchase an adventure pass. It is five dollars per day or thirty dollars per year. There are restrooms located in the parking lot, but not on the trail.

Ninety percent of this trail is intermediate, with the final section being very steep which is where it gets its hard rating. It is ideal to hike in the early morning so you will have cooler temperatures.

Based on reviews, visitors say they love the views on this trail. They also say that if you want to train for larger peaks that this is the perfect warm-up for you. The first part of this trail is easy and moderate, but the second half can be a bit more challenging.

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 10 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 2,037 Feet

4. Weir Canyon Loop Trail

Credit: Christian Tjernagel

Weir Canyon is one of the hidden gems in Orange County. The hike takes you from the trailhead down along the side of the canyon. There is no public access to the canyon bottom.

The trail is now a part of Santiago Oaks Regional Park and is accompanied by other challenging surrounding trails. It is a moderately challenging trail that will take you almost two hours to complete. This trail is open all year long and is pet-friendly as long as they are on a leash.

Weir Canyon Loop Trail is a scenic trail with challenging inclines. You may run into snakes so watch your step. There is also very little shade so make sure you come prepared with plenty of sun protection.

If you get here early in the morning you can avoid the crowds and enjoy the blooming flowers. This trail has great terrain and is very well-maintained.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 3.6 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 643 Feet

5. San Juan Hot Springs Trail

Credit: Zaranda

San Juan Hot Springs Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you about four hours to complete. This trail is not pet-friendly so you’ll have to leave your dogs at home for this hike.

This hike is great with a lot of variety in landscape. You’ll be able to enjoy shady parts of the trail and the hot springs. The springs are a collection of three pools off to the right before you reach the picnic area.

Based on reviews, visitors say the hot springs are very too hot to handle. We recommend getting to this trail early as it can become crowded.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 10.6 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,079 Feet

6. Saddleback Mountain Trail

Credit: SunflowerMomma

Saddleback Mountain Trail is an easy hike that will take you around two hours to complete. This trail is best visited from April to October. It is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

This trail is great if you are looking for a couple hours to complete, but want the experience of serene woods. You will come across points of elevation that will provide some intense exercise.

Saddleback Mountain takes you to the highest point in Orange County. It is also the highest point in the Santa Ana Mountains. The hike will take you through the Holy Jim trail, which is one of the shortest points on the summit.

Saddleback Mountain gets its name because the two peaks look like a saddle from the majority of Orange County. For gear, it is recommended to come with plenty of layers, food, and water.

This trail is gorgeous during the summer even though it’s tough to find initially. Based on reviews, visitors say this trail is easy to follow. There aren’t many steep areas of difficult terrain even though some areas are overgrown.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 4 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 633 Feet

7. Moro Canyon Loop Trail

Credit: Simon Dannhauer

The Moro Canyon Loop Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around two hours to complete. The trail is open all year long and there is a parking fee. If you take a right on the trailhead it will give you a nice view.

The way down is a bit slower and doesn’t give you an ocean view, but overall it is a relaxing hike. You can hike in any direction, but counterclockwise is strongly recommended. You’ll encounter some steep areas and even be rewarded by a nice cool breeze that comes down from the valley.

The Moro Canyon backcountry trail, from the parking lot, accesses over two thousand acres of fire roads and single-track trails. These trails are open to the public for hiking, biking, and other use.

Based on reviews, visitors say the trails are wide which makes for a more comfortable hike. The soil is dry and there’s little shade so make sure you have plenty of sun protection. These trails are open from 6 AM to sunset.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 5 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 807 Feet

8. Las Ramblas Trail

Credit: L.A. Nature Graphics

Las Ramblas Trail is an easy hike that will take you around one hour to complete. This trail is great for hiking and doesn’t get very crowded like most other trails. The views from the top of their overlook are very nice and make for a great place to exercise.

If you go in the spring you’ll see green hills and wildflowers which make this a scenic hike. There’s no shade on this trail so make sure you pack plenty of sun protection. This hike isn’t hard, but will get your heart rate up!

Based on reviews, visitors say this trail has a wide path and long stretches so you can see behind and ahead of you at all times. The hike is recommended for all skill levels.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 2.3 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 416 Feet

9. Salt Creek Trail

Credit: L.A. Nature Graphics

The Salt Creek Trail is an easy hike that will take you around three hours to complete. It is open all year long and is pet-friendly as long as they are on a leash. This trail is an easy out and back on a paved pathway.

It has great scenery and is a nice long hike if you’re looking for a distant walk. There isn’t much shade on this trail so you’ll want to bring plenty of food and water. You can park at Salt Creek or Strands to start from the beach.

Based on reviews, this trail has gorgeous views and gets pretty busy around sunset. If you want to avoid the crowds make sure you get here early.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 7.6 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 849 Feet

10. Chiquito Falls Trail

Credit: AJ9

Chiquito Falls is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around four hours to complete. The trail is open all year long and is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash. This hike has sporadic shade and a breeze every so often.

The rockiest downhill area is at the beginning of the hike. Make sure you bring a hat, sunscreen, and plenty of water. There are two little stream crossings along the way and the turn-off to the falls is about a mile down the San Juan Loop Trail.

There are lots of boulders and steep areas, but nothing too difficult that can’t be managed. Be careful when you get to the dry waterfall because the rocks are very slick.

Based on reviews, visitors say this trail is diverse and changing which keeps it interesting. If you have hiking sticks, make sure you bring them along.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 9.1 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,571 Feet

11. Laguna Ridge Loop

Credit: L.A. Nature Graphics

The Laguna Ridge Loop Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around two hours to complete. The trail is open all year long but is not pet-friendly so you’ll need to leave dogs at home.

This trail has lots of hills and rocky areas. It has incredible views where you can see the mountains, grassy hills in bloom, and the ocean all at once. There are lot of rocks near the bottom of Laguna Ridge and there is one very steep spot.

It’s a hard uphill for the first half and then becomes flat after. There are a lot of options for different routes so you’re not taking the same route each time. Laguna Coast Wilderness Park has some of the best canyons in California.

There are forty miles of trail that take visitors through oak and sycamore woodlands and up onto ridges with scenic vistas. The community covers hilltops and slopes along with areas of the Native Valley.

While in the canyons, visitors can explore habitats, and experience plentiful winter rain and the streams of spring. In the summer, you’ll be able to hike through the dry creek beds. During your hike, you may see deer, bobcats, and much more!

Based on reviews, visitors recommend hiking clockwise for a manageable hike. Visitors say this trail has great views, views of the Irvine, and lots of flowers and wildlife.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 3.9 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 974 Feet

12. San Clemente Beach Trail

Credit: L.A. Nature Graphics

The San Clemente Beach Trail is an easy hike that takes you a little over an hour to complete. It is open all year long and is pet-friendly as long as dogs are on a leash.

The trail itself is a very well-maintained, dirt, double-track trail that is surrounded by both natural and manicured California flora. It runs between beach houses and sandstone and dirt on the east and train tracks on the west.

With this trail, you can keep a good and steady pace, with slight elevation changes outside of a steep staircase at the beach landing. This trail is flat but gets very crowded so we recommend going early in the morning.

Based on reviews, visitors say you’ll have great ocean views and be able to see dolphins and osprey sitting on the pier.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 4.5 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 55 Feet

13. Peters Canyon Loop Trail

Credit: Steve Cukrov

The Peters Canyon Loop Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you a little over two hours to complete. It is open all year long and is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

There are some rocky portions along this trail, with the most part being flat. The trail is well-maintained with very few hills. Some of the hills have a steep incline and will get your heart pumping. The third hill is the toughest, but the trail is beautiful with lots of greenery. During your hike, be cautious of the rattlesnakes.

Based on reviews, this trail does get crowded so make sure you get there early. Visitors say this trail is well-kept and has plenty of options for either moderate or more extreme hiking.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 5.9 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 623 Feet

14. Black Star Canyon Falls Trail

Credit: Zaranda

The Black Star Canyon Falls Trail is a hard hike that will take you around three hours to complete. It is open all year long and is pet-friendly with dogs being allowed off their leash in some areas.

The trail is easy up to the riverbed. Once you hit the riverbed it’s rock scrambling, hiking through brush, and minimal trail clearing. The trail has nice flowers that make for a scenic hike. Make sure you wear a sturdy pair of hiking boots to walk through the middle of the rocks and water.

Based on views, visitors say the falls are almost dried out, but it still has a good scramble over the rocks. They also say to use precautions as there is some poison oak on this trail.

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 6.7 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 846 Feet

15. Horseshoe Loop Trail

Credit: Leonardo Rossetti

The Horseshoe Loop trail is an easy hike that will take you around thirty minutes to complete. The best time to visit is from October to April. This trail is also pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

It is a great trail for walking with some rocks and little elevation change. There are beautiful views and you will see homes and other developments on this trail. This trail gets busy at the trailhead but thins out pretty quick. Since the trail is rocky we recommend wearing a sturdy pair of hiking boots.

Based on reviews, visitors say this trail is very scenic but does get crowded so if you want to hike when it’s less crowded make sure you get here early. This is the perfect trail for the beginner hiker.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 1.7 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 88 Feet

16. Bommer Ridge Trail

Credit: Isabella Akker

The Bommer Ridge Trail is an easy hike that takes around three hours to complete. This trail is open all year long but is not pet-friendly so you’ll need to leave dogs at home for this hike.

The trail is often crowded with mountain bikers so make sure to take precautions. It’s an easy hike with small hills here and there.

This trail is well-maintained but has very little shade so make sure you pack plenty of sun protection. The first half of the trail doesn’t have many inclines, but the second half has brutal inclines with a few breathers in between.

Based on reviews, visitors say this is a wide trail with plenty of bumps. Make sure you come with plenty of water to battle the difficult inclines.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 7.4 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 734 Feet

17. Redtale Ridge Trail

Credit: Randal Sedler

The Redtale Ridge Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take around three hours to complete. This is a nice trail that has wonderful views of the canyon and ocean. This trail has its ups and downs, some difficult hills in the end, and there’s no shade.

You’ll want to pack plenty of sun protection for this trip. This trail is well-marked, well-maintained and easy going down to Crystal Cove. At your convenience, there are bathroom facilities at the end of each trail.

Based on reviews, visitors say this is a wide trail with great views and challenging inclines. You can park at the top for free and avoid the fifteen-dollar parking fee.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 7 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,105 Feet

18. Shady Canyon Trail

Credit: Photos by Kerstin

The Shady Canyon Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around three hours to complete. The trail is open all year long and is pet-friendly as long as they are on a leash.

This is a spacious walking trail with a paved and dirt walking option. It gets crowded on the weekends so if you want a less-crowded hike make sure to get there early and on a weekday.

For most of the trail, there are separate paths for bicyclists and hikers which makes this hiker much safer than other trails. Despite the name, there is little shade so make sure you wear sun protection.

Based on reviews, this trail has a huge parking lot, restrooms, and decently paved trails. There are also a few benches places where you can rest along the way.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 7.8 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 574 Feet

19. Buck Gully Trail

Credit: Joshua Resnik

The Buck Gully Trail is an easy hike that will take you almost two hours to complete. It is open all year long and is not pet-friendly so you’ll need to leave your dogs at home for this hike.

This is a rural trail in the middle of Newport Beach. The trail is flat, well-marked, and is great if you like nature. It has little shade so make sure you bring plenty of sun protection and water for this hike.

Based on reviews, this trail is nice but very narrow so you’ll need to share the path with bikers which may be challenging.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 4.5 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 446 Feet

20. Crystal Cove Double Loop

Credit: Aleksei Potov

The Crystal Cove Double Loop trail is a hard hike that will take you around six hours to complete. This is a flat, wide trail with hills up and down. Make sure you bring plenty of food and water and get here early. This trail can become very crowded on weekends.

This is one of the most difficult hikes in Crystal Cove Park. There are beautiful panoramic views of Crystal Cove in some parts. If you take the northwest ridge line out the end of the loop ascends to a very steep utility road.

The trail is a constant rotation between asphalt and sand, which makes hiking poles awakened to use. Based on reviews, visitors say the best part is the great view of the ocean on the second loop. You’ll also want to keep an eye out for rattlesnakes.

Difficulty: Hard
Distance: 12 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 2,286 Feet

21. Serrano Ridge West Canyon Trail Loop

Credit: Wildnerdpix

The Serrano Ridge West Canyon Trail Loop trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around three hours to complete. It is open all year long but is not pet-friendly so you’ll need to leave dogs at home for this hike.

Most of this trail is a double track with around thirty or forty percent being a single track. It has a mix of smooth rock and technical trails. This means if you are a beginner to a moderate skill level you can ride the trail and walk down the parts where you can’t. The trail is well-marked and easy to get around.

Based on reviews, visitors say this trail is harder than it looks. It has gorgeous views, but you have to pay to park so call ahead to check for pricing.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 6.7 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,010 Feet

22. Rattlesnake Loop Trail

Credit: Sandra Foyt

The Rattlesnake Loop is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around three and a half hours to complete. The trail is open all year long and is heavily trafficked. Before you plan your trip, make sure you have plenty of water and a sturdy pair of hiking boots.

If you need a rest the campground is perfect for a small picnic or rest area. It is recommended to hike this trail counterclockwise because if you hike it clockwise it will give you more incline on the way. If you like a challenge, give it a shot!

Based on reviews, visitors say this is a well-maintained trail, but use caution with bikers. Since this trail is heavily-trafficked, it’s recommended to get here earlier if you prefer it less crowded. You’ll also want to be careful of rattlesnakes.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 7.7 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,272 Feet

23. Turtle Rock and French Hill Loop

Credit: Autumn Sky Photography

The Turtle Rock and French Hill Loop trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take around two hours to complete. It is open all year long and is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

This trail has very little shade so make sure to come with plenty of sunscreen and water to stay hydrated. There are steep inclines in the beginning, but the rest is very easy.

You may see coyotes on the way so if you have animals with you just keep alert. The start of the trail is unmarked so you may want to come prepped with a map.

Based on reviews, visitors say this trail has a good mix of incline, decline, and flat terrain. There are also scenery changes from the trail to the suburban streets. Some turns can be a little tricky so make sure you have a sturdy pair of hiking boots.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 4.1 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 810 Feet

24. El Moro Canyon Loop Trail

Credit: Unwind

The El Moro Canyon Loop Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you around two hours to complete. The trail is open all year long and is less-crowded during the early morning hours.

This is a great trail to hike when the weather is warm and you’re close to the beach. The views are great and there are several trails to try.

There is a parking fee so you’ll want to call ahead to find out the pricing. You can turn right at the fork if you want a steeper incline. The left of the trail is longer and more gradual.

Based on reviews, visitors say there is a cool ocean breeze that comes down through the valley. It is a great mix of challenging, rewarding, and a workout with amazing views.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 5 Miles
Total Elevation Gain:  807 Feet

25. Barbara’s Lake Loop Trail

Credit: Hannator

Barbara’s Lake Loop Trail is an easy hike that will take you around an hour to complete. It is open all year long but is not pet-friendly so you’ll need to leave your dogs at home for this hike.

The beginning of the trail is super nice and calm and ends with more challenging hills. There’s a short incline to the peak, otherwise, it’s a very gradual trail. The trail is wide until you get to the lake and then it becomes narrow. There are loose rocks on this hike so make sure you wear a sturdy pair of boots.

Based on reviews, visitors say there are sightings of mountain lions and coyotes. This trail also has very little shade so make sure you pack plenty of water and sun protection.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 2.8 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 334 Feet

26. The Sinks at Limestone Canyon

Credit: Leashbond

The Sinks at Limestone Canyon Trail is a moderately challenging hike. This trail is on private property, you may contact the owners to see if you can get permission for hiking.

When you call, you can make a reservation to schedule a guided hike. You’ll need to pre-book this hike a few weeks ahead as there are only limited spaces available. The various hikes available are quite long and challenging, but you’ll be able to see different scenery and viewpoints.

Based on reviews, visitors love this hike for the intensity and views but are disappointed it’s by reservation only.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 9.6 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 1,535 Feet

27. Dana Point Headlands Loop Trail

Credit: Unwind

The Dana Point Headlands Loop Trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take a little over one hour to complete. This trail is not pet-friendly, so you’ll need to leave dogs at home for this hike.

This trail has a beautiful view of the Dana Point Harbor. It does have a little challenge because of the uphill on the sand, but it’s very manageable. Make sure you have directions before beginning this hike because the trail is not very well-marked.

The hike starts high above Dana Point Harbor and wanders through the marine life refuge. From there it goes down to the Salt Creek Beach Boardwalk and finally back to the headlands through a flight of stairs.

The entire hike is heavily-trafficked on cement paths and sidewalks with the exception being the narrow sandy trails through the Marine Life Refuge. This hike is great for older kids, but just know that the preserve is only open for three days.

Based on reviews, visitors love this trail for its inclines and beautiful views. You’ll want to call ahead to see if there is a parking area and parking fee.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 2.8 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 452 Feet

28. Bolsa Chica Wetlands Trail

Credit: Kit Leong

The Bolsa Chica Wetlands Trail is an easy hike that will take you around an hour to complete. It is open all year long but is not pet-friendly so you’ll need to leave dogs at home for this hike.

This easy hike will give you many opportunities to see wildlife. It’s entirely flat except for a small set of stairs at the turnaround point. Parking is very limited but there are other parking areas nearby that you can still walk to the trailhead.

There’s very little shade so you’ll want to pack plenty of sun protection and water for your hike. The trails are well-maintained with no major overgrowth. Based on reviews, visitors say this is a great short hike for an afternoon jog or warm-up.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 3 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 72 Feet

29. Carbon Canyon Regional Park

Credit: Joshua Resnik

The Carbon Canyon Regional Park trail is an easy hike that will take you about an hour to complete. The best time to visit this trail is from April to December. The trail is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

It’s a great trail for beginner and experienced hikers and had an endless series of steep climbs and downhills. It’s wide open with no shade so make sure to pack plenty of water and sun protection. There are bathrooms in the main section of the park and loads of benches for resting and play areas for kids.

There are huge, grassy areas and the trails are easy to navigate. You’ll need to pay to park for this trail. On weekdays parking is three dollars and five dollars on a weekend.

Based on reviews, visitors say this is a great trail for beginners and has amazing views. You’ll be able to see the blooming flowers and a variety of landscapes.

Difficulty: Easy
Distance: 3.1 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 104 Feet

30. Top of the World Via Canyon Acres Trail

Credit: Jeremy Christensen

The Top of the World trail is a moderately challenging hike that will take you a little over an hour to complete. The trail is open all year long and is pet-friendly as long as your dogs are on a leash.

This trail is steep and challenging with great views. It challenges the hiker at the beginning of the trail and eases a bit after that. Much of the trail is worn, smooth rock that would be slippery if wet.

The walk to the top of the viewpoint from the park is worth navigating your way through Laguna Beach. You’ll be rewarded with awesome viewpoints of the ocean and mountains. The trail to the bottom is mostly flat rock and a hard pack with no rough rocks.

Based on reviews, visitors say this trail has little cellphone service so you’ll want to make sure you print off directions for navigation. There is also no shade so make sure you bring plenty of sun protection and water. If you don’t do a lot of inclines often, this trail could get difficult.

Difficulty: Moderate
Distance: 2.4 Miles
Total Elevation Gain: 862 Feet